Mega-Disasters: Science, Policy and Human Behavior Fall 2006


Natural hazards include a wide range of earth processes that are often perceived as risky or dangerous such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, landslides, tsunamis, volcanoes, and wildland fires. In the absence of people and property, these natural events may go unnoticed. As the global population grows, more and more people and our supporting infrastructure are being built in harms way and are at risk from these natural earth processes.

Natural disasters often bring out the best behaviors in the global community to assist with disaster relief efforts and post-disaster recovery. Tom Casadevall offers two case studies to explore in depth how mitigating the threat of disasters often brings together scientists and managers to assist with pre-disaster planning and development activities. Working effectively in these challenging situations requires that we be actively aware of the social and cultural environments in which we work.

Monday, September 25, 2006
Tom Casadevall
The 1994 Rwandan Refugee Crisis: Cultural Awareness in Managing Natural Disasters
7:30 pm
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Tuesday, September 26, 2006
Tom Casadevall
The December 26, 2004, Sumatra Earthquake and Indian Ocean Tsunami
4:00 pm
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Thursday, October 26, 2006
Grant Heiken
Was the Bronze Age Volcanic Eruption of Thira (Santorini) a Megacatastrophe? A Geological/Archeological Detective Story
7:30 pm
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Wednesday, November 29, 2006
Peter Huntoon
Chairman Mao, the Great Leap Forward and the Deforestation Ecological Disaster in the South China Karst
4:00 pm
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