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Events Archive

MillerComm Lecture Series

Thadious M. Davis
Nella Larsen, author of Quicksand and Passing, was one of the most influential writers of the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920's. Cosponsored by Office of the Chancellor, Office of Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Department of English, African-American…
Angela Davis
During the period of the American Revolution, the prison was proposed as an historical alternative to corporal and capital punishment.  Today, in the era of a global prison industrial complex, this institution is cavalierly assumed to be inevitable and permanent.  In the tradition of late…
Lennard J. Davis
If we are not successful in crafting a new progressive way of seeing identity, science, left to its own devices, will invent a new identity for us through the authority of the new research being done in the name of human genomics. Hosted by: Department of Educational Psychology In conjunction with…
Richard (Dick) Davis
An anonymous scholar once remarked: "Greek literature is about freedom, Persian literature is about love." One interpretation of this comment is that Greek literature is about the autonomous individual, whereas Persian literature is about the individual in relation to something or someone outside…
Karen Dawisha
The key question in the world today is who is the real Vladimir Putin and what are his intentions. Karen Dawisha will discuss how Putin got to power, the cabal he brought with him, the billions they have looted, and his plan to restore the Greater Russia. Hosted by: Russian, East European and…
Michael Day
Historic Royal Palaces oversees the preservation, public experiences and educational offerings pertaining to five great historic royal sites in and around London.   In 2012, HRP completed an $18 million renovation of Kensington Palace.  A favorite royal residence in the Georgian period, it  gained…
Amy Dean
The "New Economy" has shredded the old Social Contract that sustained the prosperity of post-war America. The South Bay AFL-CIO, the local federation of unions in Silicon Valley, has become a laboratory for initiatives geared toward rebuilding the link between industry success and community well-…
David Dellinger
Dave Dellinger, nationally recognized organizer and leader in the civil-rights, anti-war, and American prison reform movements, will discuss the interconnections, tensions, and dynamics of these various movements in the 1960s. Mr. Dellinger, a member of the Chicago Seven, will address how the…
David Dellinger
Dave Dellinger, nationally recognized organizer and leader in the civil rights, anti-war, and American prison reform movements, will discuss the interconnections, tensions, and dynamics of these various movements in the 1960s. Mr. Dellinger, a member of the Chicago Seven, will address how the…
John Demos
Early in the 1800s, a group of eminent Protestant ministers founded a special school in the little town of Cornwall, Connecticut for “heathen youth” drawn from all corners of the earth. Their express goal was to "save" the entire world in the shortest time imaginable by converting these boys,…
Daniel C. Dennett
Daniel Dennett, author of Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon, will discuss the evolutionary origin of the widespread human disposition that tends to express itself as religiousness. While recognizing that this sort of approach leaves the truth of religious beliefs an open question…
Jason DeParle
DeParle provides a probing analysis of the consequences for poor Americans of the 1990s policies 'ending welfare as we know it.' His widely acclaimed book, American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids, And A Nation's Desire To End Welfare, weaves together the political story of welfare reform, poverty,…
Henry Der
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Dinesh D'Souza
Affirmative action has become a politically charged public policy, with repercussions affecting attitudes and opportunities across cultural, racial, and economic boundaries. Henry Der and Dinesh D'Souza represent two very different perspectives as they consider the intent, the reality, and the…
Allan deSouza
Conceptual artist Allan deSouza's work presents subtle explorations of the body in transition. Moving easily between the real and the imaginary, deSouza travels through varying cultural, geographic and historical frames, revealing both their power and limitations along the way. This lecture is held…
Jared Diamond
To explain the past 13,000 years of human history, Jared Diamond has proposed a provocative thesis which dispels racially-based theories and emphasizes the unequal distribution of domesticable animals and climatic barriers to the dissemination of early agriculture and technological developments…
Archie Dick
During the 1980s, libraries in South Africa were caught up in the turbulence of the anti-apartheid struggle. Librarians and readers responded in unusual and constructive ways to the oppressive political circumstances and state censorship of the period. As reading became subversive, libraries became…
Dan Diner
Dan Diner, one of Europe's leading historians, presents his path-breaking interpretation of the twentieth century, centered around his distinction between ethnic and civic society and his radical reinterpretation of the Holocaust, both as history and memory. Sponsored by: Drobny Program for Jewish…
Carolyn Dinshaw
Paleness is both an inborn characteristic (a racial mark) and an uncontrollable somatic effect of emotional duress (a mark of affect). Carolyn Dinshaw will look at the pale faces of Christians under duress from the East in Chaucer's texts, at the pale faces of the nineteenth-century British editors…
Virginia Rosa Dominguez
1998 marks the 100th anniversary of the U.S. occupation of Puerto Rico.  It also marks the 50th anniversary of Julian Steward's (1948) landmark project The People of Puerto Rico, a University of Illinois Press publication.  The profound social, political, and economic transformations taking place…
Ronald I. Dorn
It is generally agreed that the first people to inhabit the New World arrived on foot from Siberia, when the low sea levels of the Pleistocene converted the present Bering Strait into a land bridge. Adherents of the "Clovis" theory suggest that this migration began ~12,000 years ago, using a type…
Mark Doty
. . She's a manyou wouldn't look twice at in street clothes, two hundred pounds of hard living, the gap in her smile sadly narrative--but she's a monument, in the mysterious permission of the dress. This is Esta Noche, a Latin drag bar in the Mission, its black door a gap in the face of a battered…
Susan Douglas
The media's fixation with motherhood has produced two prevailing and opposing images: the 'canonized celebrity mom' and the 'demonized welfare mother.' How and why did these images arise, and what are their implications for mothers and for public policy? Sponsored by: Women's Studies Program In…
John Dower
The way Japan remembers World War II is sometimes radically at odds with the way it is remembered elsewhere. Pulitzer Prize winner John W. Dower describes this phenomenon, assesses America's role in enabling it and explains its implications for our understanding of the way nations construct their…
Seymour Drescher
The Mobilization of Public Opinion for the Most Successful Civil Rights Movement in History, Emancipation in 19th Century Britain   in conjunction with: School of Humanities, Department of History, Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, Afro-American Cultural Program, Center for…
Hubert Dreyfus
Are the new ways that we have of communicating with one another--teleconferencing, telecommuting, telerobots and internet web cams--resurrecting the skeptical doubts that Descartes had raised and which we thought we had overcome? Philosophy Annual Lecture This lecture is held in conjunction with…